Six steps for streamlining job search

You’ve had your resume written or updated and you feel it is in perfect shape. That is normally the first stage in a new job search. The next stage involves beginning the actual search and it’s not the same now as it was even a few years ago.  Today it’s all about branding yourself, networking, streamlining, and digging.  Let us briefly look at a just a few of the often overlooked steps in a successful job search.

  • Get a professional and dedicated email address for your job search.   I’m amazed how many resumes I get that are from someone “sassy” or “hot” – very unprofessional.  It is free and quick to get a new email address through accounts like Outlook.com or Gmail.  Make sure your address incorporates your name and is used for your job search communication only.
  • Create a list of your top 50 – 100 target companies. You may use LinkedIn, Manta or Google to create this list. Fortune also ranks the Top 100 companies in various categories.  It is actually very easy to get tons of information about your prospective employers on the internet.
  • Network through LinkedIn, the king of Business Networking social sites.  After you have created your list of companies, join groups on LinkedIn that would have employees from those companies.
  • After you are accepted into the groups,  send messages or very targeted invitations to group members within LinkedIn that you wish to connect to.  It is best to focus on people you would report to or people who are in a position to make a hiring decision.  Don’t spam people – your goal here is to connect and develop real-life relationships, not just adding numbers to your profile.
  • A few days after acceptance  or a reply from your LinkedIn contact,  send them a ‘thank-you for connecting’ email and ask if you can give them a call.  LinkedIn is about networking and getting to know people, just connecting is a waste of time.  There needs to be communication to make networking work.
  • If they accept your request, call them and introduce yourself.  At this point, you are not asking for a job, you are simply networking and sharing your story.  Look for ways in which you can be of value to them and offer to assist them where you can.  The funny thing about doing this, is you make valuable contacts and this approach often leads to referral and leads on opportunities.

Always keep your options open because the above steps will eventually lead you to more referrals and more opportunities that you would never have found otherwise.  Put yourself out there and start networking.  The vast majority of jobs today are found by networking, not posting your resume or applying to job postings.

How else have you personally used LinkedIn to network?

by:  Anjela Mangrum, CPC

Anjela Mangrum is the founder of Mangrum Career Solutions Inc.  MCS partners with industrial and machining manufacturing businesses to source and secure mid-to-upper level talent for operations, supply chain, and engineering positions.  They work to empower individual job seekers by helping them gain a competitive edge in their job search. For hiring needs contact Anjela at 513.753.3813 x101.

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